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Orbit Culture Interview

Published / Tue 16 Nov 2021

Orbit Culture guitarist Richard Hansson

Photo: Orbit Culture guitarist Richard Hansson

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Orbit Culture guitarist Richard Hansson recently spoke to Pete Bailey on Primordial Presents. In the interview, they talk about their latest single “Strangler” which made it to No.1 on Primordial Radio’s Up-Vote, how the latest EP ‘Shaman’ came together and the big plans they’re working on for 2022.

In the deep forests of southern Sweden lies the small town of Eksjö where the band Orbit Culture originates. The idea of Orbit Culture came to vocalist / rhythm guitarist Niklas Karlson in 2013 whilst working on bedroom demos; he quickly formed an early version of the band, which included drummer Markus Bladh.

Citing Metallica and Gojira as their main heavy influences, Orbit Culture are a band that loves to experiment with wide a range of sounds and textures to create something that is fresh but also familiar. Nikas comments: “As much as we love metal, we love other music, too. We love a good hard-hitting song as much as the next guy, but we’ve always found that blending and mixing genres seems more fun for us at least, rather than deciding on a specific genre to write within the metal scene. It really helps us to be creative and motivated. I’m guessing that is something that we’ll always do.”

Quickly after forming, Orbit Culture released a self-produced EP and an LP, but it was summer 2016 when two new members joined the band – Richard Hansson on the lead guitar and Fredrik Lennartsson on the bass guitar – and the quartet perfectly honed their distinctive sound.

On the new EP, vocalist and guitarist Niklas Karlsson states: “Shaman has that flow to be executed more in a live setting, which was one of the goals creating it. We want to be a band that’s able to run around the stage and engage with the audience, rather than standing in one place and sweating over weird guitar patterns. I think that’s the major difference between Nija to Shaman.

We want people to be blown away live and the songs on this EP are somewhat constructed for that. Of course, you’ll get what you expect from us; heavy and fast guitars combined with low-tuned drops followed up by singalong choruses with an exotic twist. I think that describes Shaman’s overall vibe.”


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